SuperUser Account

Embroidery Glossary Stitch Types

Run Stitch

run_stitch

 

 

This is your basic stitch. This stitch is common in both embroidery and sewing machines. Look at the seam of most jeans and you will see this stitch. Most run stitches in embroidery are between .8 mm to 5 mm in length. The stitch length is regulated and can be made to be the same length for straight or curved stitches, or given a smaller minimum for curves. Run stitches are used for detail, traveling from point to point or for underlay.

aka: Walking Stitch

Double Run Stitch

double_run

The run stitch can also be doubled back up on itself and is called a double run stitch. If the inputs are staggered, the line will be less segmented. This stitch type is most often used for thin outlines.

Manual Stitch

manual_v_run_stitch

This may appear to look like run stitch but it is unique in the stitch points are not regulated. In other words, you manually put in the stitch points, making an irregular looking run stitch.

Triple Run Stitch

triple_stitch

This is like a run stitch but goes forward a stitch, back to the previous point then forward again and repeats itself for the next stitch. Triple Stitches are generally used for outlines when a run stitch is too thin and satin stitch is not an option.

aka: Bean Stitch

Satin Stitch

satin_stitch

The most common of stitches. It is a tight zig-zag stitch that is most often used for borders and lettering. The density can be altered and end up looking similar to a zig-zag stitch.

aka: Column Stitch

Zig-zag Stitch

zig_zag

Very similar stitch to Satin Stitch, but more open between stitches with the end stitch always ending on the same side as the beginning stitch. This is often used for underlay and tack-down for appliques.

Stem Stitch

stem_stitch

Just like Zig-zag stitch but at an angle. Used most for decorative stitching or borders.

Back Stitch

back_stitch

Similar to the Triple Stitch, but the stitching is at an angle and staggered. This can be used manually as an alternative underlay for Polar Fleece and Sweaters.

Fill Stitch

fill_stitch

This is the stitch that you see for fills or wide areas. Fill stitch is a pattern that is created by a run stitch that goes back and forth really close together. The pattern can be changed. The density, distance from the edge, angle, pattern, and the edge of the stitch can all be changed. You may also see this stitch as a tackdown or underlay but with the spacing further apart.

aka: Tatami, Ceeding

 

Previous Article Digitizing Trees, Leaves, Grass and Bushes
Next Article How to Read Run Sheets
Print
29259 Rate this article:
5.0

10 comments on article "Embroidery Glossary Stitch Types"

Avatar image

Alex

I've read your article. Honestly, I've never read this type of informative and efficient article before. This article will help lots of beginners like me to build skills in embroidery. Love to read your incoming blogs too. Really appreciate your work and dedication.

We have digitizing in usa to fulfill your embroidery needs.




Avatar image

just fall

There is a lot of material in your post that I can use to further my understanding.


Avatar image

Larry Martin

Great breakdown of various stitch types in embroidery! I particularly found the explanations of the Double Run Stitch and Triple Run Stitch very insightful, providing clarity on their distinct uses for outlines and detailing.


Avatar image

Larry Martin

Thank you for this comprehensive breakdown of various embroidery stitch types! Learning about the nuances between run, double run, manual, and triple run stitches was incredibly helpful for understanding their distinct applications in creating detailed and unique designs.

Payroll Consulting in Salt Lake City UT


Avatar image

paper minecraft

Pixel Worlds-Minecraft style survival game


Avatar image

slope

The information in this article is fantastic, and the data you supplied have taught me a lot of useful stuff.



Avatar image

plancul

plan cul

Leave a comment

This form collects your name, email, IP address and content so that we can keep track of the comments placed on the website. For more info check our Privacy Policy and Terms Of Use where you will get more info on where, how and why we store your data.
Add comment

Theme picker

Small Lettering Guide – Part 2

Small Lettering Guide – Part 2

Short and Wide or Sharp Corners Wide fonts (also known as extended) and fonts with sharp corners are much more difficult to come out nice in embroidery. On corners, both the horizontal and the vertical strokes have more chance of...

Continue Reading →

Pre-Press Services and why we can’t provide them

Pre-Press Services and why we can’t provide them

There are several reasons why we can't provide this service. The most important ones are: 1. Every production shop has its own way of processing art. They all have different programs and different pre-press processes specific to their shops used...

Continue Reading →​

Optimizing your Vinyl Orders!

Optimizing your Vinyl Orders!

What is the best way to place an order for Vinyl? Placing a vector order for Vinyl application can be a tricky thing. A solid set of instructions when you place the order can help us narrow down exactly what...

Continue Reading →

How to use G-mail as a tool to view EPS/Ai/PDF files

How to use G-mail as a tool to view EPS/Ai/PDF files

Attachments have been used right from the early days of the email. Now-a-days people share more and more stuff online, rather than sending them through attachments. However it is still a part of many email users daily experience, since it...

Continue Reading →

How to Read Run Sheets

How to Read Run Sheets

Run sheets are a way to know how to program your colors in the machine without having the software directly wired to your embroidery machine.  A run sheet has the breakdowns of how many color stops there are. Some run...

 

Continue Reading →​

Embroidery Glossary Stitch Types

Embroidery Glossary Stitch Types

Run Stitch This is your basic stitch. This stitch is common in both embroidery and sewing machines. Look at the seam of most jeans and you will see this stitch. Most run stitches in embroidery are between .8 mm to...

 

Continue Reading→

Digitizing Trees, Leaves, Grass and Bushes

Digitizing Trees, Leaves, Grass and Bushes

In a previous article, I showed how stitch direction and stitch type can be used in a creative way to make more realistic landscapes. Now we will focus more on individual areas, mainly trees, bushes, and leaves. A lot of...
 

Continue Reading→

RSS
12345